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April 30, 2004

What is the Net and where is it going?

Esther Dyson, editor at large of CNET Networks, is interviewed by iMediaconnection.com about the online business model, how to market online and what and where the Net will be in five years' time. As she says, "fundamentally, what it [the Net] does is connect people". Dyson says there's no one defined business model - advertising, services, paid content, social networking all play a part. She also discounts the idea that the Net can "solve political problems. If people want to communicate, itís certainly going to help. But just linking different cultures with the Internet -- you know, itís not going to create a global village, unfortunately." Read the full interview at http://www.imediaconnection.com/content/3307.asp.
Posted by belinda at 10:42 AM | Comments (0)

BBC alerts

You can now get a desktop application that alerts you to a big breaking news story, courtesy of the BBC. The BBC already offers news via email, but the alert will pop up in front of other applications when something big happens, so it should be faster than email. You need to download a small piece of software to get it working. It was developed for the BBC by Skinkers Communications who also created a similar product for Britain's Channel 4 and Sky News and for Disney. News International is thinking of using it here in Australia. Find out more at journalism.co.uk (http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/story863.shtml) who had the story or download the application from http://www.bbc.co.uk/breakingnews.
Posted by belinda at 10:23 AM | Comments (0)

Prostate cancer fighters

Health stories are usually big, and the very biggest just could be about things that are small. Wired News has a story about tiny prostate cancer-fighting computers. These mini-computers, made up on DNA molecules, could be ingested, from where they would seek out and combat disease at the cell level. The full story is at http://go.hotwired.com/news/technology/0,1282,63265,00.html/wn_ascii
Posted by belinda at 10:14 AM | Comments (0)

April 21, 2004

EPpys

Finalists for the 2004 EPpy Awards, which honor the best new media work by media companies, have been announced. The awards are a joint project of Editor & Publisher and Mediaweek magazines. FT.com has been nominated as Best Internet News Service, along with washingtonpost.com and Google News. The full storyfrom E&P, with lists of finalists in all categories, is at http://www.mediainfo.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000485587.
Posted by belinda at 11:59 AM | Comments (0)

More online journalism webcasts

The University of Texas held a two-day symposium on online journalism (the 5th International Symposium on Online Journalism) on 16-17 April this year. Webcasts from the event will be available soon at http://journalism.utexas.edu//onlinejournalism/. However, the site includes many reports from sessions of the symposium, which covered blogging, the role of the editor, progress and innovation, definitions of multimedia journalism and more. Snapshots of previous years' symposia are also available. These include trancripts of selected sessions. So take a look now, and then go back for any Webcast of interest when they are archived.
Posted by belinda at 11:27 AM | Comments (0)

April 20, 2004

Local info

ABS (www.abs.gov.au/) has released the National Regional Profile for anyone who wants local data on an area. This could be an area as small as a suburb in a city, or a town, or could be Australia as a whole or a state as a whole. The profile consists of a standard set of social and economic data for a place and covers one year only. So if you want to know how many people live in a place, how many are employed or out of a job, how many births occurred, this is the place for it.
Posted by belinda at 04:23 PM | Comments (0)

Not an April fool's thing

Webcasts are available from several sessions from the 3rd Symposium on Converged Journalism held at the University of Florida on 1 April, 2004. The home page (in Flash) is at http://www.jou.ufl.edu/converge/. It includes information on the panels and guests. Selected Webcasts include: How Broadcast, Online and Print Journalists Work Together (1 hr 15 mins), Photojournalism in a War Zone (1 hr 49 mins), Blogging and Journalism (58 mins) and Entertainment Journalism (59 mins).
Posted by belinda at 03:08 PM | Comments (0)

Need to know?

A new article in Online Journalism Review discusses how to create an online journalism course - what should go into such a course - software skills, writing skills? And exactly what is online journalism, anway? The piece was written by Mindy McAdams of the College of Journalism and Communications at the University of Florida. Read it at http://ojr.org/ojr/education/1081490316.php. The site links to resources that could be used in teaching the subject and also to existing syllabi used for teaching the subject in different educational institutions.
Posted by belinda at 10:46 AM | Comments (0)

April 08, 2004

How are we doing?

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has just released a long statistical document of "Indicators of Australiaís welfare" - which covers not government handouts, but welfare in the broadest sense of healthy living, autonomy and participation, and social cohesion. The report finds that while Australian health is generally good, "Certain population groups experience disadvantage across multiple areas. In particular, compared with other Australians, Indigenous Australians have much poorer health, higher rates of injury-related deaths, are less likely to own their own home and more likely to be homeless. Similar constellations of disadvantage are experienced by Australians of low socioeconomic status." Read the full report at http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/workingpapers/wwp42.pdf.
Posted by belinda at 03:59 PM | Comments (0)